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Do We See People Like Jesus Did?

Do We See People Like Jesus Did? Book Cover

We turn the television off, shaking our heads in disappointment. How many more news stories will we hear that broadcast the suffering of the marginalized at the hands of those in power? Racism, sexism, classism—they are all injustices that God opposes. Not only do we find these stories in our modern news outlets, but the Bible recounts heartbreaking stories that demonstrate the depth and extent of humanity’s brokenness. Like our stories today, the privileged and powerful took advantage of those of lesser socioeconomic status, threatening their very lives. But Jesus cares about those who live on the fringes of society, those whom others turn up their noses at. Today we turn to John 8 and see how Jesus rightly shows the balance between standing up against injustice and extending mercy and compassion.

Unlike the Samaritan woman, this woman had been caught in an act of sin and ostracized because of it.

Picture it. In the early verses of John 8, Jesus was teaching the crowd. He was interrupted by the religious rulers, who had brought a woman with them. What was the reason? They accused her of adultery, having caught her in the very act. And they demanded that Jesus condone her to be stoned to death. What must the crowd have thought? What must that have been like for the woman, to be caught in the act but also to be brought before the public in such a shameful way? Perhaps her friends and family members were in the crowd also.

But John reveals this was a setup, having nothing to do with the woman or condemning sin. The Pharisees wanted to condemn Jesus and bring some charge against him that would finally drive him out of town.

How cruel of these leaders. Instead of responding with a definitive yes or no, Jesus looked at them and demanded that the one who was without sin should be the one to throw a stone at her. He refused to let those in power take advantage of the outcast for their evil purposes. Neither did he allow the marginalized woman to remain in her brokenness. He said to her, “Go your way and sin no more.” What a healing and virtuous moment.

gospel to the marginalized

Repeatedly, the Scriptures show us Jesus’s incredible compassion for the marginalized. He does more than just improve their physical circumstances. He gives them a sense of identity and purpose and shows them, and us, just how valuable everyone is in God’s eyes.

Because many societies still view and treat women in ways that do not honor God, God wants us to stand up against these injustices and show women that they are loved, they are valued, and they are precious in his sight. He will readily forgive sin, no matter how unworthy we feel our sin has made us.

We have the incredible privilege of restoring value to those who live in the margins, including women. Why? We have Jesus and he has equipped us with such good news that will heal and restore hurting people.

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What the Women Saw

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Jesus Sees the Marginalized

Daily Question

Do you know women with pain and shame in their past or even present lives? How can you communicate to them God’s grace and forgiveness? Ask for God’s wisdom and guidance to help you.

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Comments (12)

The biggest cause of separation I have experienced is the ways I am left out of church life because I am not a mom. I have learned to use it as a blessing because it has opened my eyes to see other women who feel left out.

Oh friend, I feel you on this! I find it hard to connect with other women in my church because I am the only one my age who is not a mom. I work and have a career, mainly because this is the path God chose for me. But sometimes I feel like I have nothing in common with the others my age. Praying you can find connection and community!

Thank you for your prayers! It is hard to find common ground. I try to gently remind church leadership about the “others,” the ones who don’t fit into the typical family boxes and advocate for their inclusion. Sometimes I am heard and other times I am not, but I know that I have the power to be the one who sees the others and do something about it myself. It’s led to an eclectic group of friends in my life, whom I love.

I identify with the bleeding woman because I have suffered from depression and eating disorders that have cost me many relationships. I was isolating myself for the last 3 years feeling like no one understood the pain that all of this has caused me, and I felt so much shame in sharing it. I think God wants me to repair those barriers by sharing my story of healing and reconciliation with them.

Moved by your video but extremely encouraged by young women teaching The Word with such clarity and enthusiasm. God has blessed me with 71 years -49 of them studying Scripture and growing to love Him more and more. I was refreshed this morning by you. Thank you.

After seeing yesterday’s great video dealing with the woman at the well, I had to share the best video I’ve ever seen of the story as eighth episode in The Chosen. It truly brought to life the Joy of the redeemed woman and the sweetness of Jesus is honoring her.
You can find it on YouTube. I highly recommend it.

Reminds me of the song..🎶🎶.give me your eyes for just one second…🎶🎶 give me your eyes so I can see🎶🎶 everything that I keep missing…give me your love for humanity.🎶🎶

A great song to run through my head today!!❤️

Lord, I pray show the way that I can be like Jesus and show his great compassion for the marginalized today and everyday.

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